Events Calendar - SPRING 2018

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THURSDAY Jan. 18 : Faculty Meeting
Title: Tenured Faculty Meeting
.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 122
WEDNESDAY Jan. 24 : Combinatorics Seminar
Title: Organizational Meeting
Natalia Rozhkovskaia, Mikhail Mazin, Pietro Poggi-Corradini
Kansas State University
The plan for this semester is to study the theory of transitional probabilities on Young diagrams, introduced by Kerov in 1993, and related subjects. During the first meeting, Prof. Rozhkovskaia will give a brief introduction to the area, and then we will discuss particular papers to be read and presented at the seminar. Graduate students are especially invited to participate.
Time and Place: 12:30 PM CW 129
THURSDAY Jan. 25 : M-seminar
Title: Homological mirror symmetry of birational cobordisms
Gabriel Kerr
Kansas State University

Abstract: Abstract: A birational cobordism is a basic variation of GIT from a stack $X_+$ to $X_-$. On the level of derived categories, this results in a semi-orthogonal decomposition $D(X_+) = \left< D(X_- ) , \mathcal{T} \right>$ where $\mathcal{T}$ has a full exceptional collection. There is a mirror to this basic operation which yields a homological mirror to $\mathcal{T}$. This is a Landau-Ginzburg model on a higher dimensional pair-of-pants. This talk will explain this result and sketch the proof of the one dimensional case. The general case follows from dimensional induction which will be explored if time permits.
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW 131
WEDNESDAY Jan. 31 : Combinatorics Seminar
Title: The Law of Large Numbers and the Central Limit Theorem
Luke Langston, Vincent Newberry, and Joshua Stucky
Kansas State University
The Law of Large Numbers (LLN) and the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) are two of the most important results in probability theory. Although commonly understood through archetypal examples, we will present a rigorous development of these results. These can be stated as follows: Let A be a set of independent and identically distributed random variables Xi with expected value μ. The Law of Large Numbers states that as the size of A goes to infinity, the average of A will converge to μ. Similarly, the Central Limit Theorem states that as the size of A tends to infinity, the distribution of this average, after a suitable normalization, tends toward a normal distribution.
Time and Place: 12:30 PM CW 129
THURSDAY Feb. 01 : TWENTY-SIXTH HARRY E. VALENTINE LECTURE
Title: Complex Dynamics and Elliptic Curves
Laura DeMarco
Northwestern University

Abstract: In this talk, I will explain some connections between recent research in dynamical systems and the classical theory of elliptic curves and rational points. I will begin with the theorem of Mordell and Weil from the 1920s, presented from a dynamical point of view. I will continue by describing a dynamical/geometric proof of a recent result of Masser and Zannier about torsion points on elliptic curves and "unlikely intersections". Finally, I aim to explain the role of dynamical stability and bifurcations in deducing arithmetic finiteness statements.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 102
M-seminar
Title: Homological mirror symmetry of birational cobordisms II
Gabriel Kerr
Kansas State University

Abstract: Abstract: A birational cobordism is a basic variation of GIT from a stack $X_+$ to $X_-$. On the level of derived categories, this results in a semi-orthogonal decomposition $D(X_+) = \left< D(X_- ) , \mathcal{T} \right>$ where $\mathcal{T}$ has a full exceptional collection. There is a mirror to this basic operation which yields a homological mirror to $\mathcal{T}$. This is a Landau-Ginzburg model on a higher dimensional pair-of-pants. This talk will explain this result and sketch the proof of the one dimensional case. The general case follows from dimensional induction which will be explored if time permits.
Time and Place: 04:00 PM CW 131
FRIDAY Feb. 02 : Topology Seminar
Title: Symplectic background
Lino Amorim
Kansas State University
Abstract: In this introductory talk, I will survey some basic notions, examples and questions in Symplectic Geometry: origins in Hamiltonian dynamics, basic definitions, Arnold conjectures and Lagrangian submanifolds. If time permits, I will discuss in more detail the symplectic geometry of cotangent bundles.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW129
MONDAY Feb. 05 : Number Theory Seminar
Title: Estimates for the Vinogradov character sum
Todd Cochrane
Kansas State University

This year marks the hundredth anniversary of the famous 1918 Gottingen Nachrichten publication featuring three articles, one by Polya, one by Schur, and one by Landau, all estimating a character sum that has become known as the Vinogradov character sum. We will discuss new estimates for this sum.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM Gen. Myers Hall 210
TUESDAY Feb. 06 : Faculty Meeting
Title: Graduate Faculty Meeting
CANCELLED
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 122
Analysis Seminar
Title: Leibniz-type rules and applications to scattering properties of PDEs
Virginia Naibo
Kansas State University
Abstract: We will discuss Leibniz-type rules in the setting of various function spaces and present applications to scattering properties of certain PDEs. This is joint work with Alex Thomson.
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW 131
WEDNESDAY Feb. 07 : Combinatorics Seminar
Title: The Law of Large Numbers and the Central Limit Theorem (Continuation)
Luke Langston, Vincent Newberry, and Joshua Stucky
Kansas State University
The Law of Large Numbers (LLN) and the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) are two of the most important results in probability theory. Although commonly understood through archetypal examples, we will present a rigorous development of these results. These can be stated as follows: Let A be a set of independent and identically distributed random variables Xi with expected value μ. The Law of Large Numbers states that as the size of A goes to infinity, the average of A will converge to μ. Similarly, the Central Limit Theorem states that as the size of A tends to infinity, the distribution of this average, after a suitable normalization, tends toward a normal distribution.
Time and Place: 12:30 PM CW 129
THURSDAY Feb. 08 : COLLOQUIUM
Title: Periodic Harmonic Function and Their Applications
Yuri Godin
University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Abstract: Harmonic functions are widely used in mathematics and physics. Their forms are well-known for rectangular or circular domains. These functions appear also in the problems of composite materials and hydrodynamics where for the determination of the effective properties of composite or potential flow one needs to find a harmonic function in a domain containing periodic arrangement of inclusions. In my talk, I will discuss such problems for the Laplace equation in two and three-dimensional cases.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 122
This talk is supported by the ADVANCE Distinguished Lecture Series (ADLS).
FRIDAY Feb. 09 : Topology Seminar
Title: Cotangent bundles and Weinstein manifolds
Lino Amorim
Kansas State University

Abstract: In the first part of the talk I will continue last week's discussion of the symplectic geometry of cotangent bundles and the Arnold nearby Lagrangian conjecture. The second part of the talk will be an introduction to more general Weinstein manifolds - this will serve as background to Eliashberg talk in a few weeks.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW129
MONDAY Feb. 12 : Number Theory Seminar
Title: Estimates for the Vinogradov character sum, Part 2
Todd Cochrane
Kansas State University

This year marks the hundredth anniversary of the famous 1918 Gottingen Nachrichten publication featuring three articles, one by Polya, one by Schur, and one by Landau, all estimating a character sum that has become known as the Vinogradov character sum. We will discuss new estimates for this sum.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM Gen. Myers Hall 210
TUESDAY Feb. 13 : COLLOQUIUM
Title: Reducibility of the Fermi Surface for Periodic Quantum-Graph Operators
Stephen Shipman
Louisiana State University

Abstract: The Fermi, or Floquet, surface for a periodic operator at a given energy level is an algebraic variety that describes all complex wave vectors admissible by the periodic operator at that energy. Its reducibility is intimately related to the construction of embedded eigenvalues supported by local defects. The rarity of reducibility is reflected in the fact that a generic polynomial in several variables cannot be factored. The "easy" mechanism for reducibility is symmetry. However, reducibility ensues in much more general and interesting situations. This work constructs a class of non-symmetric periodic Schrödinger operators on metric graphs (quantum graphs) whose Floquet surface is reducible.

The graphs in this study are obtained by coupling two identical copies of a periodic quantum graph by edges to form a bilayer graph. Reducibility of the Floquet surface for all energies ensues when the coupling edges have potentials belonging to the same asymmetry class, that is, when their "spectral A-functions" are identical. If the potentials of the connecting edges belong to different asymmetry classes, then typically the Floquet surface is not reducible. Bilayer graphene is a notable exception---its Floquet surface is always reducible.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 122
Analysis Seminar
Title: Efficient computation of diffraction near cutoff (Wood anomaly) frequencies
Stephen Shipman
Luisiana State University
Abstract: We present an efficient method for computing wave scattering by 2D-periodic diffraction gratings in 3D space near cutoff frequencies, at which a Rayleigh wave is at grazing incidence to the grating. At these frequencies (a.k.a. Wood-anomaly frequencies), the quasi-periodic Green function does not exist, although a solution to the diffraction problem typically does. This is manifest in the divergence of a doubly infinite spatial lattice sum that represents the Green function at generic frequencies. We present a modification of this lattice sum by adding two types of terms to it. The first type adds weighted spatial shifts of the Green function to itself. The shifts are such that the spatial singularities introduced by these terms are located below the grating and therefore out of the spatial domain of interest. With suitable choices of the weights, these terms produce algebraic convergence of the lattice sum. The degree of the algebraic convergence depends on the number of added shifts. The second type of terms are quasi-periodic plane wave solutions of the Helmholtz equation. They reinstate the grazing modes, effectively eliminated by the terms of the first type. These modes are needed for guaranteeing the well-posedness of the boundary-integral equation for the scattered field that involves the Green function. This is joint work with O. Bruno, C. Turc, and S. Venakides.
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW 131
WEDNESDAY Feb. 14 : Combinatorics Seminar
Title: Representation Theory of Sn, Part I.
Gabriel Necoechea
Kansas State University
A (complex) linear representation of a group is a group homomorphism pi: G -> GL(V), where V is a complex vector space. An important tool in studying representations of finite groups is character theory, which tells us that we need only consider conjugacy classes when trying to count the irreducible representations (=irreps) of a group. For G = Sn, the conjugacy classes are in bijection with partitions of n, and we can extract lots of information about the irreps of Sn from these partitions. In particular, by Specht's construction, each irrep of Sn can be thought of as a vector space over the standard young tableaux associated to a partition L. Such a vector space is called the Specht Module associated to L. By construction, the dimension of the Specht Module associated to L is #{standard young tableaux of shape L}, which is given by the Hook Length Formula.

In this talk, we will define representations, irreducible representations, and characters of representations. We will see that characters, which are certain C-valued class functions on G, characterize irreducible representations. Then we will turn attention to the specific case of Sn, where we will construct Specht modules. An attempt will be made to present many examples.
Time and Place: 12:30 PM CW 129
THURSDAY Feb. 15 : M-seminar
Title: Minicourse on GIT, Part 2
Rina Anno
Kansas State University

Abstract: Today we are going to prove that every action of an irreducible algebraic group G on a quasi-projective normal algebraic variety can be linearized in the following sense: there exists a G-equivariant embedding of X into the projective space P^n for some n, where G acts on P^n via a linear representation G \to GL_{n+1}. We are going to discuss the correspondence between embeddings of X into a projective space and base point free line bundles on X. We will introduce G-bundles, the group Pic^G(X) of line G-bundles on X, and the connection between Pic^G(X), Pic(X), and Pic(G).
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW 131
Mini-course
Title: Introduction to Lie Superalgebras I
Dimitar Grantcharov (UTA) Natasha Rozhkovskaya (K-State)

Part I of the crash-course (review) on Lie algebras. We will state the main facts and discuss many illustrating examples - the necessary information for understanding of "super" part of the mini-course.
Lecturer: N. Rozhkovskaya


General information;
Participants are encouraged to register officially for this 1-credit course
(Math 896-G). Meeting will last 6:20-8:50 pm. Pizza will be provided to the participants of mini-course as a courtesy of math department.
Time and Place: 06:20 PM CW 131
FRIDAY Feb. 16 : Topology Seminar
Title: Smale-Hirsch Theorem
Jacob Pichelmeyer
Kansas State University

Abstract: My initial intention, since it is a talk based on material that would be presented to graduate students in Math 996, is to make it very graduate student-friendly by providing many definitions and exposition so that an average graduate student can easily follow from the beginning of the talk to the end. I would start by discussing the Compression theorem, including what is a normal (vs perpendicular normal) vector field, before giving definitions of immersion and formal immersion (with some examples), and then ending with the Smale-Hirsch theorem and its proof.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW129
Mini-course
Title: Introduction to Lie Superalgebras II
Dimitar Grantcharov (UTA) Natasha Rozhkovskaya (K-State)

Part II of the crash-course (review) on Lie algebras. We will state the main facts and discuss many illustrating examples - the necessary information for understanding of "super" part of the mini-course.
Lecturer: N. Rozhkovskaya


General information;
Participants are encouraged to register officially for this 1-credit course
(Math 896-G). Meeting will last 6:20-8:50 pm. Pizza will be provided to the participants of mini-course as a courtesy of math department.
Time and Place: 06:20 PM CW 131
MONDAY Feb. 19 : Number Theory Seminar
Title: Truncated Squares and Pell Equations
Joshua Stucky
Kansas State University

A truncated square is a number like 25 or 16. These are square numbers which have been "truncated" from the larger squares 256 and 169 by removing the 1's digit. In these talks, I will present the requisite background theory on Pell equations for those that are unfamiliar with the subject. I will then apply this theory to fully classify truncated squares by giving a closed form expression for them. I will also state some interesting results which follow from this classification. Lastly, I will present some conjectures pertaining to truncated cubes as well as some methodology which might be useful in their resolution.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM Gen. Myers Hall 210
Mini-course
Title: Introduction to Lie Superalgebras III
Dimitar Grantcharov (UTA) Natasha Rozhkovskaya (K-State)

Abstract: In this mini-course we will cover topics and results related to finite-dimensional classical Lie superalgebras over an algebraically closed field of characteristic zero. We will state the Classification Theorem of all such superalgebras and will give a brief outline of the methods involved in its proof. We will also provide explicit constructions for each classical simple Lie superalgebra g of type A, B, C, D as well as of type P,Q. Basic properties of the representations of classical Lie superalgebras will be given and differences with the representations of Lie algebras will be discussed. Most of the theorems will be illustrated with examples that show how theorems for Lie algebras have nontrivial analog in the case of Lie superalgebras. .
Lecturer: D. Grantcharov


General information;
Participants are encouraged to register officially for this 1-credit course
(Math 896-G). Meeting will last 6:20-8:50 pm. Pizza will be provided to the participants of mini-course as a courtesy of math department.
Time and Place: 06:20 PM CW 131
TUESDAY Feb. 20 : Analysis Seminar
Title: Dynamics of complex Henon mappings
Remus Radu
University of Toronto
Abstract: Complex Henon maps are a special case of polynomial automorphisms of C2 which arise from physical applications and are central objects in the study of holomorphic dynamics in 2D. In this talk we discuss recent progress on Henon maps with a semi-neutral fixed point, which exhibit non-hyperbolic behavior.
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW 131
M-Seminar
Title: Spherical twists and projective twists in Fukaya categories
Weiwei Wu
University of Georgia

Seidel's Lagrangian Dehn twist exact sequence has been a cornerstone of the theory of Fukaya categories. In the last decade, Huybrechts and Thomas discovered a new autoequivalence in the derived cateogry of coherent sheaves using the so-called "projective objects", which are presumably mirrors of Lagrangian projective spaces. On the other hand, Seidel's construction of Lagrangian Dehn twists as symplectomorphisms can be easily generalized to Lagrangian projective spaces. The induce auto-equivalence on Fukaya categories are conjectured to be the mirror of Huybrechts-Thomas's auto-equivalence on B-side.
This remains open until recently, and I will explain my joint work with Cheuk-Yu Mak on the solution to this conjecture using the technique of Lagrangian cobordisms. Moreover, we will explain a recent progress, again joint with Cheuk-Yu Mak, on pushing this further to Lagrangian embeddings of finite quotients of rank-one symmetric spaces, leading to another new class of auto-equivalences, which are different from the classical spherical twists only in coefficients of finite characteristics.
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW 120
Mini-course
Title: Introduction to Lie Superalgebras IV
Dimitar Grantcharov (UTA) Natasha Rozhkovskaya (K-State)

Abstract: In this mini-course we will cover topics and results related to finite-dimensional classical Lie superalgebras over an algebraically closed field of characteristic zero. We will state the Classification Theorem of all such superalgebras and will give a brief outline of the methods involved in its proof. We will also provide explicit constructions for each classical simple Lie superalgebra g of type A, B, C, D as well as of type P,Q. Basic properties of the representations of classical Lie superalgebras will be given and differences with the representations of Lie algebras will be discussed. Most of the theorems will be illustrated with examples that show how theorems for Lie algebras have nontrivial analog in the case of Lie superalgebras. .
Lecturer: D. Grantcharov


General information;
Participants are encouraged to register officially for this 1-credit course
(Math 896-G). Meeting will last 6:20-8:50 pm. Pizza will be provided to the participants of mini-course as a courtesy of math department.
Time and Place: 06:20 PM CW 131
WEDNESDAY Feb. 21 : Function Theory Study Seminar
Title: Hedgehogs in higher dimensions
Raluca Tanase
University of Toronto
Hedgehogs in dimension one were introduced by Perez-Marco in the '90s to study linearization properties and dynamics of holomorphic univalent germs of (C, 0) with a neutral fixed point. In this talk we discuss hedgehogs and their dynamics for germs of holomorphic diffeomorphisms of (C^2, 0) with a fixed point at the origin with a neutral
eigenvalue. We show how to use quasiconformal theory to transport results from one complex dimension to higher dimensions. This is based on joint work with T. Firsova, M. Lyubich, and R. Radu.
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW-120
Mini-Course
Title: Introduction to Lie Superalgebras V
Dimitar Grantcharov (UTA) Natasha Rozhkovskaya (K-State)

Abstract: In this mini-course we will cover topics and results related to finite-dimensional classical Lie superalgebras over an algebraically closed field of characteristic zero. We will state the Classification Theorem of all such superalgebras and will give a brief outline of the methods involved in its proof. We will also provide explicit constructions for each classical simple Lie superalgebra g of type A, B, C, D as well as of type P,Q. Basic properties of the representations of classical Lie superalgebras will be given and differences with the representations of Lie algebras will be discussed. Most of the theorems will be illustrated with examples that show how theorems for Lie algebras have nontrivial analog in the case of Lie superalgebras. .
Lecturer: D. Grantcharov


General information;
Participants are encouraged to register officially for this 1-credit course
(Math 896-G). Meeting will last 6:20-8:50 pm. Pizza will be provided to the participants of mini-course as a courtesy of math department.
Time and Place: 06:20 PM CW 131
Combinatorics Seminar
Title: Representation Theory of Sn, Part II.
Gabriel Necoechea
Kansas State University
A (complex) linear representation of a group is a group homomorphism pi: G -> GL(V), where V is a complex vector space. An important tool in studying representations of finite groups is character theory, which tells us that we need only consider conjugacy classes when trying to count the irreducible representations (=irreps) of a group. For G = Sn, the conjugacy classes are in bijection with partitions of n, and we can extract lots of information about the irreps of Sn from these partitions. In particular, by Specht's construction, each irrep of Sn can be thought of as a vector space over the standard young tableaux associated to a partition L. Such a vector space is called the Specht Module associated to L. By construction, the dimension of the Specht Module associated to L is #{standard young tableaux of shape L}, which is given by the Hook Length Formula.

In this talk, we will define representations, irreducible representations, and characters of representations. We will see that characters, which are certain C-valued class functions on G, characterize irreducible representations. Then we will turn attention to the specific case of Sn, where we will construct Specht modules. An attempt will be made to present many examples.
Time and Place: 12:30 PM CW 129
THURSDAY Feb. 22 : M-seminar
Title: Minicourse on GIT, Part 3
Rina Anno
Kansas State University

Abstract: We are going to define stable, unstable, and semistable points for a G-linearized line bundle L on X. We are going to show that an open subset of the semi-stable (resp. stable) locus of X (with respect to L) admits a categorical (resp. geometric) quotient. We will discuss how to glue these quotients together to achieve the main result of this lecture: the semi-stable locus of X admits a good categorical quotient, and the stable locus of X admits a geometric quotient.
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW 131
mini-Course
Title: Introduction to Lie Superalgebras VI
Introduction to Lie Superalgebras I
Dimitar Grantcharov (UTA) Natasha Rozhkovskaya (K-State)

Last lecture of the mini-course will be dedicated to
1) basic properties of finite-dimensional Clifford algebras
2) Fock space representation of infinite-dimensional Clifford algebra.
Lecturer: N. Rozhkovskaya


General information;
Participants are encouraged to register officially for this 1-credit course
(Math 896-G). Meeting will last 6:20-8:00 pm. Pizza will be provided to the participants of mini-course as a courtesy of math department.
Time and Place: 06:20 PM CW 131
FRIDAY Feb. 23 : Topology seminar
Title: Delooping the manifold calculus tower for closed discs
Victor Turchin
Kansas State University
Abstract: I will talk about the problem of delooping the space of maps of discs $D^m\to D^n$, $n\geq m$, coinciding with the standard embedding near the boundary and avoiding any given type of singularity depending on several points. For example, one can consider spaces of embeddings and spaces of non-$k$-equal immersions. As another example, one can forbid self-tangency, or any mixed condition on self-intersection and local singularity at intersection points.

I will start with some history of this problem. In particular I will explain how the celebrated Deligne's Hochschild cohomology conjecture is related to this problem.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 129
WEDNESDAY Feb. 28 : Combinatorics Seminar
Title: A Probabilistic Proof of Hook’s Formula via a Random Walk
Carrie Frizzell
Kansas State University
In the representation theory of the symmetric group Sn, there is a one-to-one correspondence between irreducible representations of the group and partitions of n. For any partition λ, the dimension of the corresponding irreducible representation is equal to the number of standard Young tableaux (SYT) for the associated Young diagram. This dimension can be determined by a computationally simple formula that depends on the hook lengths of the diagram. This talk will be a presentation of a paper by Greene, Nijenhuis and Wilf, in which they use a game on a random walk both to construct a random SYT of shape λ and to prove the formula.
Time and Place: 12:30 PM CW 129
THURSDAY Mar. 01 : THIRTIETH ISIDORE & HILDA DRESSLER LECTURE
Title: From Differential Topology to Symplectic and Back
Yasha Eliashberg
Stanford University

Abstract: There are several canonical symplectic geometric constructions which can be performed on smooth manifolds. For instance, the cotangent bundle of a smooth manifold has a canonical symplectic structure, and one can ask whether the symplectomorphism type of the cotangent bundle remembers the smooth topology of the manifold. In the opposite direction any affine 2n-dimensional Weinstein manifold (which is the symplectic counterpart of a Stein complex manifold) can be viewed as the cotangent bundle of a possibly singular n-dimensional complex, and one can ask whether symplectic invariants can be described in terms of smooth topology of this complex. I will discuss the interplay between these two directions.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 102
M-seminar
Title: Two perspectives on mirror symmetry for hypersurfaces
Benjamin Gammage,
Berkeley

Abstract: Recent developments in the theory of microlocal sheaves allow us to compute symplectic invariants from the skeleton of a symplectic manifold. We will explain this in the context of affine hypersurfaces, for which we will describe two types of skeleta and derive proofs of homological mirror symmetry.
Time and Place: 04:00 PM CW 131
TUESDAY Mar. 06 : Faculty Meeting
Title: Graduate Faculty Meeting
.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 122
THURSDAY Mar. 08 : Faculty Meeting
Title: Graduate Faculty Meeting
.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 122
Continuation if needed.
M-seminar
Title: Categorical BN theory and applications.
Ludmil Katzarkov
University of Miami

Abstract: TBA
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW 120
THURSDAY Mar. 15 : COLLOQUIUM
Title: A Thurston Boundary for the Teichmuller Space of an Infinite Surface
Dragomir Saric
Queens College and Graduate Center at CUNY

Abstract: We define a Liouville map of infinite dimensional Teichmuller spaces into the space of geodesic currents. The space of geodesic currents is endowed with a novel uniform weak* topology thus ensuring that the Liouville map is a homeomorphism onto its image; the image is closed and unbounded. A Thurston boundary consists of asymptotic rays to the image of the Liouville map. It turns out that the Thurston boundary consists of precisely those geodesic currents that are given by bounded measured laminations in a perfect analogy to the classical case of finite-dimensional Teichmuller spaces. This is a joint work with Francis Bonahon.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 122
Analysis Seminar (note special day and classroom for this week)
Title: Limit of Teichmuller geodesics on Thurston boundary of the Teichmuller space of the unit disk
Dragomir Saric
CUNY
Abstract: We continue our study of Thurston boundary of infinite dimensional Teichmuller space by considering the universal Teichmuller space and limits of certain geodesics on the corresponding Thurston boundary. Our result is that any Teichmuller-type geodesic has a unique limit point on Thurston boundary for the weak* topology which is in analogy to the closed surface case where almost every geodesic has a unique limit point(Masur). Surprisingly this convergence fails to be uniform even for some "relatively simple geodesics". Moreover, the limits are not given by the transverse measure of the vertical foliations but rather by the modulus of the vertical foliation. In addition, we consider a non-Teichmuller-type geodesic known as Strebel's chimney. We obtain a unique limit point on Thurston boundary but its support is not contained in the vertical foliation. This is joint work with Hrant Hakobyan.
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW 102
TUESDAY Mar. 27 : Faculty Meeting
Title: Tenured Faculty Meeting
.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 122
THURSDAY Mar. 29 : Faculty Meeting
Title: Tenured Faculty Meeting
.
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 122
Continuation if needed.
M-Seminar
Title: TBA
Junwu Tu
University of Missouri
TBA
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW 131
THURSDAY Apr. 12 : M-seminar
Title: tba
Yu-Wei Fan
Harvard University
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW 131
TUESDAY Apr. 17 : COLLOQUIUM
Title: tba
Eric Bedford
Stony Brook University

Abstract: tba
Time and Place: 02:30 PM CW 122
This talk is supported by the ADVANCE Distinguished Lecture Series (ADLS).
THURSDAY Apr. 19 : M-seminar
Title: TBA
Nikon Kurnosov

University of Georgia
Abstract: tba
Time and Place: 03:30 PM CW 131